When Social Media Becomes an Oxymoron, Part II: Student Free Speech and Substantial Disruption

Student social media use has resulted in school concerns regarding harassment (particularly, cyberbullying), creation of a substantial disruption or material interference in the school, and a marked increase in what may be termed “true threats,” this latter topic the focus of this article.

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NAAG Endorses First Step Act

As our jurisdictions’ Attorneys General, public safety and the faithful execution of the law fall squarely on our shoulder. Constituents hold us uniquely accountable for ensuring our communities provide a safe place to work and raise a family. To that end, we have supported legislation that strongly punishes criminal conduct while making sure people exiting prison pose less of a threat than when they entered.

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Supreme Court Federal Habeas Opinions in the 2017 Term

Federal habeas law continues to be of significant interest to the Supreme Court. This article summarizes the Supreme Court’s decisions on habeas cases in the 2017 term.

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Protecting Veterans’ Access to Housing

Once the Washington Attorney General’s Office heard that landlords were turning veterans away from housing because they were using Veterans Affairs Supporting Housing vouchers to pay rent, the office’s Civil Rights Unit sent investigators out to determine the extent of the problem and ensure that such discriminatory conduct ceased. A new Washington law specifically prohibiting such discrimination gives the Civil Rights Unit the authority to insist that recalcitrant landlords come into compliance and end discriminatory practices.

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When Social Media Becomes an Oxymoron, Part I: Free Speech, True Threats, & “Just Kidding”

With increased concerns over school security, public schools implementing state laws may find themselves running afoul of constitutional rights of students. This increasingly draws attorneys general into the fray. Social media use by students raises important questions as to whether or to what extent public schools may discipline students for threats posted on social media. The first in a two-part series.

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Social Media is the New Town Square: The Difficulty in Blocking Access to Public Accounts

Advising public officials on the use and misuse of social media must take into account constituents' First Amendment right to access and comment. Determining whether a social media post is "official" or "personal," determining how officials can limit comments, and learning platforms' methodology for limiting contacts are essential components to determine how this new "public space" for discussion can be regulated.

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Curricular Objectives and the Public Schools: Current Events and the Teaching about Religion

A deputy attorney general from Indiana discusses the complexities of weaving religious studies into public school curricula and which school systems have run the legal gamut as a result.

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